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30 Banned Books You Should Probably Read Right Now

Celebrate the freedom to read by picking up one (or all) of these banned books

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Whether it’s on the news or your Facebook feed, you’ve probably noticed comments about the rise in book banning in libraries and schools. The fight over censorship and banned books is nothing new, but there seems to be a fresh effort to purge the shelves of so-called edgy cultural commentary (as in Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You), uncomfortable interpretations of reality (such as I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and the Holocaust book Maus), discussions of gender identity (as with George M. Johnson’s banned book All Boys Aren’t Blue) and provocative stories that could lead to political questioning (The Handmaid’s Tale, anyone?).

Parents, school board members and activists have all been responsible for removing some of the best books of all time from bookshelves. Of course, sometimes book banning backfires. When a book is banned, readers wonder why. And some feel compelled to buy the restricted work as a vote for free speech—like the teens who’ve created banned book clubs in protest.

Our curated list of stellar banned books includes 30 of what the American Library Association deems the most frequently banned books since 1990. (Psst! In the United States, a book might be banned from the library or a store, but that doesn’t mean it’s illegal to read it.) So whether you want to read the best fiction books or the nonfiction books everyone is talking about, these banned books are a great place to start.

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What is the No. 1 banned book?

It’s difficult to say which book is the most banned in the United States. That’s because book banning is rarely a federal matter. Book bans tend to be specific to schools, towns or sometimes states. But we do know that book banning has affected titles in a range of book genres and categories—everything from the best children’s books to classic books and plenty of books about race relations in America.

What are the top 10 most banned books?

The jury’s still out for banned books of 2022, but here are the top 10 most challenged books of 2021, according to the American Library Association:

  • Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe
  • Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison
  • All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson
  • Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Pérez
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews
  • The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
  • This Book Is Gay by Juno Dawson
  • Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin

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1. Maus by Art Spiegelman

Let’s start with the banned book on everybody’s mind these days: Maus, a memoir in graphic novel form. The story was first published in 1980 as a magazine serial but really gained attention when it was released as the first volume of Maus: A Survivor’s Tale in 1986. The second volume was published in 1992 and went on to win a Pulitzer Prize—the first and only graphic novel to achieve that honor. Through cartoons, Art Spiegelman detailed the horrors of the Nazi invasion and Holocaust in a brazen way that wouldn’t be possible in another format. The characters are portrayed as animals separated by species rather than ethnicity, a bold, jarring move. Despite its widespread critical acclaim, Maus was recently pulled from Texas library shelves. Why? Nudity (of animals) and profanity. Removing thoughtful materials because they offend is nothing new, but this particular ban has rekindled debates over censorship and convenient whitewashing of tragic historic events.

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2. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison’s 1970 bestseller is also one of the best short books in our collection. The Bluest Eye is a perfect introduction to Morrison’s iconic lyrical style. The book offers the story of Percola Breedlove, a Black girl who longs for blue eyes. When her dream comes true, it turns out to be more nightmare than fantasy. In 1994, the book was banned in Alaska and Pennsylvania schools for graphic descriptions and offensive language. Toni Morrison’s literary and societal impact led to the USPS honoring her on one of the new 2023 stamps.

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3. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

Jack London’s 1903 classic follows Buck, a giant, lovable cross between a Saint Bernard and Scotch collie. When the dog is stolen from his home to be sold as a sled dog, he must fight tooth and nail to survive. The story of a pampered pet turned survivor includes strong themes of individualism and social Darwinism. The result? Multiple incidents of book-banning in Europe—Italy, Yugoslavia and Nazi territories, specifically—for this historical novel.

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4. Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe

Maia Kobabe’s autobiographical graphic novel, which explores coming out to the family as nonbinary, has been criticized by religious conservatives since it was published in 2019. Perhaps that’s because Gender Queer unflinchingly portrays and normalizes topics still often misunderstood: adolescent sexuality, asexuality and the differences between gender identity and sexuality. One Amazon reviewer called this heartfelt memoir “a handbook for nonbinary kids that would help them feel not so alone.” We can’t think of a better way to describe it. Like many other banned stories, Gender Queer is perfect for members of the LGBTQ+ community and anyone who wants to be a better ally to their fellow humans.

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5. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Anne Frank’s diary was never meant to be public. The book, published in 1947, is a clear-eyed glimpse into the thoughts of a young teenager hiding in an attic to avoid being rounded up by the Nazis during World War II. But no, her diary hasn’t been removed from libraries because of the terror undergirding this heartbreaking account. Schools have deemed some of the 14-year-old’s plain descriptions of her anatomy “pornographic.” Even worse: One Alabama textbook committee asked for it to be added to the banned books list because it was “a real downer.” And yes, it’s certainly a sad book because of Anne Frank’s fate, but it’s also moving, hopeful and funny—and definitely worth a read.

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6. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Despite being so beloved, Harper Lee’s novel is still the fourth most challenged or banned classic book in the United States. Set in 1960s Alabama, the coming-of-age tale follows young Scout Finch, brother Jem and father Atticus during the arrest and trial of a Black man accused of raping a white woman. Through Scout’s eyes, readers bear witness to the deep injustice of the situation along with the bittersweet lessons of growing up. Advocates of banning the book argue that its issues with racism and sexuality aren’t suitable for young readers. Their stance hasn’t affected the popularity of the book (or its movie adaptation)—it’s widely considered one of the greatest books of all time.

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7. Where’s Waldo? by Martin Handford

Nope, this one isn’t a joke. The Where’s Waldo? illustrated books barely have any words, yet for an entire decade, they were some of the most banned. While readers were searching for Waldo after the book was originally published in 1987, they spotted something: a partially topless woman sunbathing in a beach scene. People complained, and the book landed among the top 100 most banned books in America between 1990 and 2000. More recently, Where’s Waldo? Santa Spectacular was banned in Texas prisons because it contained stickers. For more child-friendly fare, pick up one (or a few) of these nonfiction books for kids.

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8. Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Pérez

Ashley Hope Pérez’s 2015 young adult novel Out of Darkness has landed on many a list of banned books for its graphic depictions of teen sex. Of course, this passionate romance novel between a Mexican American girl and a Black boy in 1930s Texas also covers important, complex topics like segregation, rape and forbidden love. If you like this one, check out more books by Latinx authors—they’re great reads whether you’re part of the community or just looking to experience stories from a culture outside your own.

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9. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

Where the Wild Things Are is one of those rare children’s books that frightens some adults for its edgy portrayal of kids’ imaginations and subconscious desires. The story follows young Max, who is sent to bed without supper because he ran wildly through the house. That night, Max’s dreams take him to a dark land where he becomes king of the Wild Things and leads a loud, hair-raising “Wild Rumpus.” It was tough enough for author Maurice Sendak to get his borderline dark book published, but when it finally hit shelves in 1963, it (like Max) got in even more trouble. Where the Wild Things Are is now a fun classic, but it was initially banned because little Max’s punishment was starvation and the story had disturbingly supernatural themes. If the supernatural’s your jam, check out our list of the top vampire books for adults.

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10. The Giver by Lois Lowry

Lois Lowry’s 1993 dystopian book for children has made waves for nearly three decades now. Set in a seemingly utopian community where everyone has a clear role and family group, The Giver turns dark when a boy named Jonas realizes the high cost of living without pain, war or blatant hatred. As the underworld of this dystopia is revealed, readers are exposed to mentions of infanticide, suicide and euthanasia. These themes—along with some violent passages—led to the story’s first banned books case in 1994. Despite its somewhat grown-up themes, Lowry’s Newbery Medal–winning classic is a worthy read (or listen; it’s available as an audiobook on Audible) for all kids.

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11. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

This whimsical 1865 novel by Lewis Carroll has been adapted numerous times in literature, onstage and on screen, but it’s not beloved worldwide. The story centers on Alice’s disorienting adventure down a rabbit hole and into a fantasy world of talking animals and utterly absurd events (ahem, Mad Hatter tea party). It’s obvious why some parents might feel bewildered by this nonsensical book. But is its psychedelic-like prose worth banning? In 1931, the governor of China’s Hunan province thought so. He believed it was “disastrous to put animals and human beings on the same level,” as the book does.

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12. All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson

LGBTQIA+ advocate and nonbinary writer George M. Johnson calls this 2020 book a memoir manifesto. The collection of personal essays chronicles their experience as a queer Black person in the United States. Of course, honest descriptions of gender identity, racism and queer love have raised the hackles of those who advocate for banning books with sensitive content. Yes, All Boys Aren’t Blue includes graphic content that might not be appropriate for some younger readers, but the book is also an essential work of representation.

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13. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

Khaled Hosseini’s 2003 debut novel whisks readers away to Afghanistan, where the son of a rich man and the son of his servant forge an unlikely friendship. As the plot unfolds, fissures form in their nation’s foundation, and the boys explore betrayal, redemption and the power of familial love. Despite the poignant themes, The Kite Runner has been banned multiple times for referencing sexual violence and “promot[ing] Islam.”

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14. The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

Considered by many (including Reader’s Digest) to be one of the best books of all time, The Things They Carried is Tim O’Brien’s heartbreaking account of the Vietnam War. Though sometimes billed as a novel, this 2009 book is more of a collection of short vignettes and essays, all somewhat autobiographical portrayals of the author’s time in Vietnam. Will it reflect all soldiers’ experiences? No. But for the throngs of readers who have never been forced to see war head-on, the book offers a sampling of memories. Though frequently included in high school curriculums, this book has been banned in the past for obvious reasons: senseless and, according to some, gratuitous violence.

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15. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Laurie Halse Anderson’s 1999 book dives straight into the thorny subject of sexual assault. The young adult novel follows high school freshman Melinda Sordino after a life-changing assault during a summer party. The ensuing confusion—both internal and external—results in her being ghosted by her peers. The novel has been banned and challenged more than once, usually because of the rape scene. In some instances, it has been removed from shelves for its portrayals of teen drinking, profanity and even a claim that it’s biased against male students.

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16. George by Alex Gino

Alex Gino’s novel has been on the American Library Association’s Top 10 Most Challenged Books list more than once since its 2017 debut. The unfortunate reason for the widespread restriction of this Scholastic novel is all too clear: It’s a children’s book about a transgender girl. The story follows Melissa, who her teacher and classmates call George. When Melissa is shut down for wanting to play a female role in the class play, she decides it’s time to change things. Though many teachers have praised George for its straightforward portrayal of a transgender child, it has frequently been pulled from shelves for LGBTQIA+ content and a plot that conflicts with certain communities’ religious beliefs.

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17. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Angie Thomas’s 2017 New York Times bestseller frequently appears on lists of banned stories. Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter lives in two realities: a predominantly white prep school by day, and her mostly Black, low-income neighborhood by night. Starr’s careful balancing act crumbles when a police officer kills her unarmed friend. Unsettling depictions of police brutality, violence and racism have led some to ban The Hate U Give from classrooms and libraries. Despite (and perhaps because of) these heartbreaking scenes, the book is worth a read—especially if you’re starting a book club.

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18. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood’s bestselling book (which inspired the Hulu TV show) is as dystopian as they come. A mysterious medical blight has rendered most women infertile. New England has been overtaken by a group of patriarchal religious fanatics. And at the crossroads are the handmaids—women taken hostage by the government because of their ability to have children. In The Handmaid’s Tale, one of the women tells her story. Of course, the requisite scenes of sexual tyranny have gotten this book banned again and again. According to the American Library Association, it has been challenged for “vulgarity and sexual overtones.” With Season 5 of The Handmaid’s Tale now available to watch on Hulu, there has been a growing interest in reading the book that inspired this hit show.

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19. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi’s book was birthed just before a swell of Black Lives Matter protests in the summer of 2020. But even before that, the authors of Stamped had begun leaving a deep imprint on libraries’ nonfiction collections. This children’s book about diversity provides readers with context for the racial tensions of today and offers hope for a more antiracist world in the future. And yet it was among the top 10 most challenged books of 2020, primarily for the authors’ bold public words and the claims that the book includes “selective” snippets of history. But while it may not be a history text, it’s certainly a must-read book about racism.

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20. Go Ask Alice by Anonymous

What makes Go Ask Alice (1971) one of the most controversial books of all time? The depiction of teenagers locked in a destructive cycle of drug abuse, for one. And probably the bold stories featuring sexual abuse and prostitution too. This hotly debated work of young adult fiction is written in diary form and reads as if written by a 15-year-old teen runaway on a journey to find herself—if she doesn’t destroy herself first. It’s no wonder Go Ask Alice has been banned time and time again for its explicit themes.

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21. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou’s 1969 memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings unpacks the poet’s childhood and early years as a writer. It’s a beautiful and tender coming-of-age story that offers readers a glimpse of love and creativity, yes, but also racism and trauma. As of 2010, the book was already weighed down by 39 challenges or bans. Most complaints stem from the memoir’s true depictions of rape and molestation. Some go so far as to call the book “anti-white.” But as many point out, when a Black author’s true story is deemed offensive simply for being told, readers would do well to ask themselves who provoked the abusive events in the first place.

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22. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

This 1937 book by Nobel Prize–winning author John Steinbeck has been pulled from shelves for almost a century. Common complaints focus on the novella’s racial slurs and stereotypes. Of course, the debate over Steinbeck’s prized work is similar to the ones around the likes of To Kill a Mockingbird. Using racial slurs to highlight racism still means that the writer used profane, hateful language. Racism is a central theme in Of Mice and Men, which details the journey of two migrant ranch workers in Depression-era California.

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23. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

Sherman Alexie’s semi-autobiographical young adult novel about an amateur cartoonist has made waves since 2007. In the story, Junior leaves behind his school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white public high school with a Native American mascot. The reflections on race and identity are at once funny, poignant and heart-wrenching. The book has been banned several times, mostly for its profanity and references to sex. More recently, however, the book has been challenged because of sexual harassment allegations against the author himself.

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24. James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

No matter how you feel about human-size bugs, Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach seems innocent enough at first glance. It’s a 1961 children’s book about an orphan who makes friends with two creatures living inside a peach. Adventure ensues. Some schools have challenged the fantastical story for language, plus tobacco and alcohol references. But the oddest reason? In 1999, one small Wisconsin town officially made it one of its banned books after claiming that a scene in which a spider licks her lips could be “taken in two ways, including sexual.” Can’t say that would have been our first thought.

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25. Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison

Jonathan Evison’s 2018 novel follows Mike Muñoz, a 22-year-old Mexican man who can’t seem to get ahead. Mike didn’t get much in the way of education. He lacks successful role models or mentors. He’s practically penniless. But there’s no doubt he’s talented when it comes to landscaping. So can Mike leverage his talents for a shot at the American Dream? You might be wondering why a classic American coming-of-age story has been banned. Well, profanity, for one. Add to that a few sexually explicit scenes, and you’ve got a few jittery school boards purging the shelves of this YA book. But Lawn Boy offers plenty of discussion points, making it a perfect pairing for these book club questions.

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26. Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

Despite their widespread popularity, the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling have been challenged by Christian religious leaders and groups, with some even calling them “satanic.” That’s because the book series centers on a young wizard and his crew of friends at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Dark magic, evil villains, sorcerers, oh my! Schools across the country have banned the Harry Potter series for its themes of witchcraft as well as its portrayals of death and evil.

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27. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time is widely considered a must-read for its creative take on splitting the twin elements of space and time. The 1962 science-fiction fantasy follows persnickety Meg Murry as she enters parallel universes in search of her father. Her companions, Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which, add lovable quirks and color along the way. So why has the book been banned, you ask? Primarily for its whimsical melding of science and the supernatural, which some religious adherents take issue with. Those in favor of banning this book can’t seem to agree on a reason, though: It’s been banned for being both too religious and not religious enough.

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28. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

Published in 2012, this irreverent book about dying is still one of the most banned books in 2022. Readers seem to either love or hate the story of three awkward teens as they navigate an impossible situation. Greg and Earl are snarky and self-absorbed. As for Rachel? Well, she’s got cancer. For anyone who thought The Fault in Our Stars was too saccharine, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl offers an alternative: a book about teens and dying that feels just crass and off-kilter enough to be genuine. Of course, the crude humor and lack of empathy regarding death have gotten Jesse Andrews’s debut novel banned more than a few times.

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29. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley’s 1931 dystopian book was first banned in Ireland for “anti-religion, anti-family and blasphemous content,” according to Carnegie Mellon University’s Banned Books Project. Other countries soon followed suit. Before long, Brave New World was topping the banned book list in at least eight U.S. states. So what makes the cast of characters and plot so shudder inducing? Possibly the portrayals of orgies, drugs and rampant consumerism in exchange for personal freedom. In the book, a man born and raised outside the dystopian society becomes a tourist spectacle for his lack of addiction and adherence to independence. The book’s tragic ending begs the reader to answer: Would you rather be happy or free?

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30. Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin

This award-winning nonfiction collection features interviews with transgender teens. As with Alex Gino’s George, the motivation behind banning this book is painfully apparent. The pages brim with real-world stories of homophobia, transphobia, sexual and gender identity struggles, and the ups and downs of transitioning. It’s unfortunately been pulled from many shelves for LGBTQIA+ content. But some folks in the trans community have also criticized it for being voyeuristic—though the book features trans voices, it’s written by (and thus benefits) a non-trans author.

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Leandra Beabout
Leandra is a lifestyle writer covering health, travel, and literature. A former high school English teacher, she covers books, words, and grammar for RD.com. When she’s not on deadline, you can find her curled up with a new library book or road-tripping through Europe or the American West.